1886 Hayt’s Corner’s, Ovid & Willard Rail-Road

By 1917, the “Willard” train stopped at every building on the 1,000 acre complex. The beautiful photographs below, from the year 1886, are from the book Pictorial Album of The Willard Asylum 1869 – 1886 by Wayne E. Morrison. (Originally posted January 9, 2013).

1 A Work Train Transporting Patients

1 A Work Train Transporting Patients

Hayt’s Corners, Ovid & Willard Railroad
On September 15, 1882, this railroad was chartered to run from the Hayt’s Corners Station of the Geneva, Ithaca & Sayre Railroad, an affiliate of the Lehigh Valley, to Ovid, seat of Seneca County (2 miles), and Willard, site of the Willard State Hospital (5 miles). The promoters, led by George W. Jones, lacked funds to complete the line, and arranged for it to be leased to the GI&S for 99 years. This was to bring it into the LehighValley system from its opening in May 1883. The line was dual gauge from the outset, laid with 3’-0” rail for conformity with some trackage built on the hospital grounds in 1877-78 to switch coal to hospital facilities from steamboats or barges on Seneca Lake.”
(SOURCE: Hilton, George Woodman, American Narrow Gauge Railroads, Stanford University Press, 1990, page 454).

2 Another View Of The Above

2 Another View Of The Above

“…An efficient auxiliary in the management of the asylum was the rail-road from Seneca Lake to the Branch, serving also the Main Building and Detached Buildings No. 1 and 3, constructed and brought into regular use in 1878. A steam locomotive and six freight and coal cars are upon the tracks, performing in a very satisfactory manner the work for which the line was constructed, and an actual saving of expense to an establishment so large and extended. With side tracks and turn-outs, it is over two miles in length, and cost including construction and equipment about $19,000. A brick engine-house for use and shelter of the locomotive was erected at the same time.”
(SOURCE: Morrison, Wayne E., Pictorial Album of The Willard Asylum 1869 – 1886, 1978).

3 The Rail-Road East Of The Main Building

3 The Rail-Road East Of The Main Building

“REPORT OF THE RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS.
HAYTS CORNERS. OVID AND WILLARD. Lessor.
Lessee – LehighValley Railway.
(Date of charter, September 15, 1882.)
The Hayts Corners, Ovid and Willard railroad was organized in 1882, and articles of association filed in the Secretary of State’s office September 15, 1882. The right of way was purchased by subscription; the grading was done by the able-bodied inmates of the Willard Insane Asylum, pursuant to an act, chapter 362, Laws of 1882. The roadbed was then leased to the Geneva, Ithaca and Sayre Railroad Company, said road to iron, fence and operate said road. Said company have conformed to the requirements of the lease and are now operating the road.

4 The John, Private Car Of Gen'L. Magee, Lehigh Valley R.R.

4 The John, Private Car Of Gen’L. Magee, Lehigh Valley R.R.

Capital Stock.
Authorized by law or charter – (Common) Number of Shares 400; Par Value $40,000
Issued for actual cash and now outstanding – (Common) Number of Shares 41; Par Value $4,100

5 The Supply Train

5 The Supply Train

Cost of Road.
Land and land damages – Total cost up to June 30, 1892 – $2,278.52

6 Charles Beach, Conductor, H.C., O. & W. Rail-Road

6 Charles Beach, Conductor, H.C., O. & W. Rail-Road

Officers of the Company.
Name. Title. Official Address.
James B. Thomas, President, Ovid, N. Y.
William Jones, Treasurer, Ovid, N. Y.
John F. Covert, Secretary, Ovid, N. Y.

7 Passenger Train No. 5, Hayts Cor's., Ovid & Willard Rail-Road

7 Passenger Train No. 5, Hayts Cor’s., Ovid & Willard Rail-Road

Directors of the Company.
Name. Residence.
George W. Jacacks, Geneva, N. Y.
James B. Thomas, Ovid, N. Y.
William Jones, Ovid, N. Y.
William C. Hazleton, Ovid, N. Y.
Charles V. Sutton, Ovid, N. Y.
John Denniston, Ovid, N. Y.
Alden Horton, Ovid, N. Y.
John K. Covert Ovid, N. Y.
Silas M. Kinne, Ovid, N. Y.
Herman D. Eastman, Lodi, N. Y.
Abram B. Johnson, Hayts Corners, N. Y.
John B. Chapin, Philadelphia, Pa.

8 Private Car Of The Sup't., Lehigh Valley Rail-Road

8 Private Car Of The Sup’t., Lehigh Valley Rail-Road

Title of company, Hayts Corners, Ovid and Willard Railroad Company.
General offices at Ovid, N. Y.
Date of close of fiscal year, September 22.
For information concerning this report, address James B. Thomas, President.”

(SOURCE: Tenth Annual Report Of The Board Of Railroad Commissioners Of The State Of New York, For The Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1892. Transmitted to the Legislature January 9, 1893. Commissioners: Samuel A. Beardsley, Michael Rickard, Alfred C. Chapin, Volume II, Albany: James B. Lyon, State Printer, 1893, Page 278).

9 The Hayts Cor's., Ovid & Willard Train

9 The Hayts Cor’s., Ovid & Willard Train

10 The Baldwin Rail-Road Engine

10 The Baldwin Rail-Road Engine

10 The Baldwin Rail-Road Engine

11 Engine-House, Barn & Coal Tressle.

12 At Work On The Embankment

12 At Work On The Embankment

13 Workmen Broadening The Embankment

13 Workmen Broadening The Embankment

Photographs from A Compendium of Insanity 1898

Photographs from A Compendium of Insanity by John B. Chapin, M.D., 1898

The following photographs taken in 1898 are of actual patients of the Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane. They were included in the book, A Compendium of Insanity by John B. Chapin, M.D., as an aid to help physicians and alienists (psychiatrists) identify “insane” patients simply by looking at them.

PLATE I.

Plate I - Idiots 1898

Plate I – Imbeciles & Idiots 1898

1. Imbecile – Medium Grade
2. Imbecile – High Grade
3. Idiot – Low Grade
4. Idiot – Excitable
Page 30

 

PLATE II

Plate II - Melancholia 1898

Plate II – Melancholia 1898

1. Simple Melancholia
2. Melancholia with Agitation
Page 100

 

PLATE III.

Plate III - Melancholia & Mania 1898

Plate III – Melancholia & Mania 1898

1. Melancholia with Stupor Chronic Delusional Insanity
2. Acute Mania Chronic Mania
Page 116

 

PLATE IV.

Plate IV - Insanity & Mania 1898

Plate IV – Insanity & Mania 1898

1. Chronic Delusional Insanity
2. Chronic Mania
Page 122

 

PLATE V.

Plate V - Insane Criminals 1898

Plate V – Insane Criminals 1898

1. Chronic Mania: Homicide
2. Chronic Mania with Fixed Delusions: Homicide
3. Habitual Criminal and Convict: Chronic Mania
4. Habitual Criminal and Convict: Chronic Mania
Page 130

 

PLATE VI.

Plate VI - Paranoia & Composite Portrait 1898

Plate VI – Paranoia & Composite Portrait 1898

1. Paranoia
2. Composite Portrait of Eight Cases of Paresis (By Dr. Noyes)
Page 130

 

(Paresis – slight or incomplete paralysis. General Paresis chronic meningoencephalitis from a syphilitic infection that is causing gradual loss of cortical function, resulting in progressive dementia and generalized paralysis; this may occur 10 to 20 years after an initial infection of syphilis in untreated individuals. Called also Bayle’s disease and dementia paralytica). SOURCE: Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved. (https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/paresis).

SOURCE: 20. Reprinted from Chapin, John B., A Compendium of Insanity, (John B. Chapin, M.D., L.L.D., Physician in Chief, Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane; Late Physician Superintendent of Willard State Hospital, New York; Honorary Member of The Medico-Psychological Society of Great Britain and The Society of Mental Medicine Belgium, etc.), Illustrated, Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, 925 Walnut Street, 1898, Pages 30, 100, 116, 122, 130. <http://books.google.com/>

Original PDF file created by Linda S. Stuhler 2011.

https://inmatesofwillard.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/photographs-compendium-of-insanity1.pdf

Good Bye!

I started this blog on July 10, 2011, thinking that maybe 5 people would actually read it and find the posts interesting. Five years later, I have created 12 pages, written 211 posts including countless PDF files, published 739 comments, and received 352,795 views. I self-published The Inmates of Willard 1870 to 1900: A Genealogy Resource, on December 17, 2011, with my own money, to further the cause of restoring dignity to the forgotten people who lived and died at New York State Hospitals (Insane Asylums), who had been buried on New York State property in anonymous, unmarked cemeteries and graves for over a century. New York State Senate Bill S840A-2015 became a law on August 18, 2016, but it did not include provisions for a searchable database available to the public as New York State lawmakers and the Office of Mental Health believed that if they did so, they would be sued. Their belief is that putting a name on a memorial or a headstone in public is different than publishing the names on a specific public website (as if no genealogy geek in the future will photograph the graves along with the names and publish them on the internet). This makes no sense to me. I believe that the New York State Office of Mental Health did not want to disclose the names of deceased patients because the burial ledgers may have been carelessly lost or destroyed. They would also have to explain why these cemeteries had never been marked in over 150 years, why they fell into such a state of neglect and disrepair in the first place, and why Kings Park State Hospital Cemetery is being used as a youth baseball field. The following states took a different approach and put searchable databases on the internet available to the public: Kansas; Minnesota; Nebraska; Ohio; TexasMaryland; Florida; Washington; and even Binghamton State Hospital of New York has a searchable list on line.

Monument For The Forgotten-Museum of disABILITY History, Buffalo, NY.

Monument For The Forgotten-Museum of disABILITY History, Buffalo, NY.

The reason why New York State Hospitals / Insane Asylums, Feeble-Minded and Epileptic Custodial Institutions are so important to the world is because there were 26 of them, possibly more. These institutions housed many newly arrived immigrants during the mid 19th and early 20th centuries from all over the world, especially Western Europe. I’m sure that there are plenty of people who would like to know the final resting place of their long, lost ancestor. It just doesn’t seem fair to me that this one stigmatized group of people are being denied the one and only thing that we really have to be remembered by; our name. Even though I initiated the original bill in August 2011 and it was introduced to the New York State Senate by Senator Joseph E. Robach in March 2012, I was never allowed to write it. This is the bill that I would have written:

“This bill is important and necessary in order to restore the dignity and personhood of the thousands of people who were incarcerated and died at former New York State Insane Asylums, (later renamed State Hospitals), Feeble-Minded and Epileptic Custodial Institutions. When the bodies of the inmates were not claimed by family members, they were buried in anonymous, unmarked graves, or, their bodies and brains were given to medical colleges for research. These forgotten souls deserve to have their names remembered and available to the public by means of a searchable internet database. Some of these deceased patients were undoubtedly United States Veterans who served during the Civil War, WWI, WWII, Korea, and Viet Nam, who suffered from PTSD and Shell Shock. Their graves deserve to be marked with the American Flag and honored like any other veteran’s grave.

The list of these former New York State Hospitals includes but is not limited to: Binghamton, Buffalo, Central Islip, CreedmoorDannemora, EdgewoodGowanda, Hudson River, Kings Park, Long Island, Manhattan, Marcy, Matteawan, Middletown, Mohansic, Pilgrim, Rochester, St. Lawrence, SyracuseUtica, and Willard

The Feeble-Minded (Intellectual Disabilities) and Epileptic Custodial Institutions of New York includes but is not limited to: Craig Colony for Epileptics, Letchworth Village for Epileptics & Intellectually Disabled, Newark State School for Intellectually Disabled Women, Rome State School for Intellectually Disabled Adults & Children, and Syracuse State School for Intellectually Disabled Children. There may be more.

There is no good reason why these long deceased souls need to be punished and stigmatized in death for an illness or intellectual disability that they lived with in life. The great majority of these former state hospitals closed in favor of smaller group home settings or changed their names to Psychiatric Centers in the early 1970s. This in turn led to many patients being thrown onto the streets to live in cardboard boxes, or thrown into jail with no psychiatric services, just as they did 150 years ago. I do not understand why anyone would need to have their name withheld from any cemetery list until 50 years had passed after their death. This requirement in the bill only serves to feed the stigma.”

Well, the bill that I wanted didn’t come to pass. I will keep this blog up and running for the purpose of historical research and I might post something now and then but there is nothing left for me to blog about, and I will not continue to bang my head against the wall trying to convince New York State lawmakers and the New York State Office of Mental Health to change their position. So, I will say, Good Bye! A few years ago, I donated $100.00 dollars to the Willard Cemetery Memorial Project and I cannot afford to give any more. If you are so inclined, please donate to the cause or start a cemetery organization of your own. The saddest part of this law is that by the time this organization raises enough money to mark 5,776 graves, I will be too old to care, and I am not aware of any other cemetery organizations for the other 25 New York State institutions. Thank you for all of your support over these past five years! May God Bless You and Your Loved Ones!!

Sincerely, Linda S. Stuhler

QUESTIONS & CONCERNS: CONTACT JOHN ALLEN, Director, Office of Mental Health, Office of Consumer Affairs, Central Office Staff, 44 Holland Avenue, Albany, New York 12229, Phone: (518) 473-6579, Fax: (518) 474-8998.

Photo by Roger Luther at www.nysAsylum.com

Photo by Roger Luther at http://www.nysAsylum.com

2014 Glass Photo Negatives Discovered in Binghamton’s Historic Asylum

TREASURES OF THE TIER by Roger Luther is a column about Historic Locations in New York’s Southern Tier. Roger has also created nysAsylum a website that has countless photographs and historical information on Binghamton, Buffalo, Utica, and Willard State Hospitals.

Camera-Roger Luther

Camera-Roger Luther

The discovery of these rare, historical photographic dry plates tells us a few things. One, photographs do indeed exist of patients who lived and died at Binghamton State Hospital over one hundred years ago. It also tells us that the New York State Office of Mental Health never took the time to save and preserve these important artifacts and didn’t give a hoot about them until the finding was brought to their attention. As usual, now they are very concerned. I believe the burial ledger was also found among the piles of dirt, dust, and pigeon poop. It will be interesting to see if the OMH will let these photographs be released and viewed by the public, or if they will come up with some lame excuse as to why we are not allowed to view them. Thank You, Roger Luther and the volunteers of the Broome County Historical Society and the Greater Binghamton Health Center, for meticulously scanning, restoring, and preserving these historical artifacts!

Materials-Roger Luther

Materials-Roger Luther

The following article “Windows Into The Past-Thousands of Glass Photo Negatives Discovered in Binghamton’s Historic Asylum” by Roger Luther is reprinted with permission. Please click on the RED link below to view more photographs. Sorry friends, there are no photographs of patients.

Photographic Dry Plates-Roger Luther

Photographic Dry Plates-Roger Luther

“Sarah was led from her ward to a nearby building. Entering a small room she sat motionless in a chair facing a large strange-looking wooden contraption. In a flash, her photograph was taken. The man behind the camera told her to turn her head to the right and then… another flash. While Sarah was led away, the photographer removed a large wooden frame from the camera and inserted another for his next subject.

Later in his darkroom, a 5×7-inch glass plate was carefully removed from its wooden frame and washed in chemical baths revealing two black & white negative images of Sarah’s face and profile. The photographer then scribed Sarah’s name and a number on the back of the glass plate and placed it in a box with several others.

That was one hundred years ago, and according to the U.S. Census of 1900, at that time Sarah was listed along with 1,388 others as a patient at Binghamton State Hospital.

A century after her photograph was taken, preparations were being made to rehabilitate the long-vacant Main Building, known as the Castle, on the campus of the former Binghamton State Hospital. A small team of volunteers representing the Broome County Historical Society and the Greater Binghamton Health Center, took on the task of removing items of historical significance from the building, then relocating them to a controlled environment and cataloguing each of the artifacts. Early in the process an amazing discovery was made. A door at the back of the old asylum chapel opened into a small room piled high with various items and debris. Photographs, books, documents, and a variety of other items were mixed with pieces of fallen ceiling plaster, decomposed pigeon parts, and a thick mixture of dirt and dust.

Like excavating an archeological site, layer by layer the material was carefully removed. At one point a small stack of dusty glass plates was uncovered, each measuring 5×7 inches. Holding one of the plates up to a window, a negative image on the glass could be seen. These glass plates were in fact hundred-year-old photographic negatives. Soon, more plates were uncovered in a broken cardboard box, and the dig continued. At the bottom of the pile several more boxes were found. Ultimately, hundreds of glass plates were discovered scattered throughout the room, some broken, some cracked, and most covered with a layer of dirt and plaster dust. Finally a path was cleared to the back of the room where a tall wooden cabinet stood. The cabinet door was pried open and there it was… the mother lode. Over the next several days over 5,000 glass dry-plate photo negatives were removed from the room.

After relocating the glass plates to a controlled environment, a plan was established to carefully clean the plates and then package them in protective acid-free archival material. The next step would be to digitally scan and catalogue each image – an ongoing effort that continues to this day.

Taken over an approximate 25-year period during the early 1900’s, the photos show life at the StateHospital as it was in the earliest years. Subject matter includes hospital staff, buildings, farms, medical charts, and events – but by far, most of the photos are of patients.

As stated in the 1892 Annual Report of the Trustees of Binghamton State Hospital, “it is very desirable to preserve with the records of cases treated in the hospital, photographs of the individual patients.” The report goes on to say that “the modern dry-plate methods of photography are so simple that they are easily managed… the sum we should require to purchase the apparatus necessary would be $300.” Soon after that a camera was procured, and in 1894 one of the nurses at the hospital, Fred W. Ernie, took on the task as photographer along with his other responsibilities.

The trustees could not have known how significant their decision would prove to be. Thanks to their foresight, images were recorded representing thousands of lives-once-lived. Images, that according to Mark Stephany, Director of the Greater Binghamton Health Center, “restore a level of dignity to people long forgotten.”

Today, the images would be invaluable as a resource for historians and those researching family history, however, issues regarding possible public access cannot be addressed until the restoration and scanning effort has been completed. As stated by Darby Penney, co-author of The Lives They Left Behind: Suitcases from a State Hospital Attic, “the discovery, rescue and conservation of this collection of 5,000 images from Binghamton State Hospital is an incredible feat of preservation and an invaluable contribution to the historical record.”

What happened to Sarah? Nearly 30 years after her listing on the 1900 census, while still a patient at the StateHospital she died and was buried in the hospital cemetery, her grave marked only by a number. But her story does not end there. Construction of an interstate highway in 1961 cut directly through the cemetery forcing the relocation of 1,504 of its nearly 4,000 graves to a nearby field. According to records released by the Department of Transportation at the time, Sarah’s grave was among those moved. Today the relocated cemetery appears as a large empty field, its numbered stone grave markers having long ago settled below ground.

Sarah’s existence, like many of the others on that census list, was one of obscurity. But unknowingly, she and the other patients left their mark for posterity. Like a century-old Facebook, the discovery of this 100-year old time capsule has brought their images to light – and as these faces from the past are being restored and preserved, so to is the dignity of people long forgotten.”

BINGHAMTON STATE HOSPITAL-Main Building-Removal of Artifacts.

1896 Middletown

Here are some wonderful photographs from the Twenty Fifth Annual Report of the Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital at Middletown 1896

Entrance to Middletown 1896

Entrance to Middletown 1896

Middletown 1-1896

Middletown2-1896

Middletown2-1896

Middletown3-1896

Middletown3-1896

Middletown4-1896

Middletown4-1896

Middletown5-1896

Middletown6-1896

Middletown6-1896

Middletown7-1896

Middletown7-1896

Middletown8-1896

Middletown9-1896

Middletown9-1896

Middletown10-1896

Middletown10-1896

1948 The INVACAR

This is part 2 of my visit to The Museum of disABILITY History. I was so intrigued by The INVACAR that I had to learn more about it. I had never heard of or seen one before. According to Elvis Payne at 3-wheelers.com, “The Invacar Ltd (UK) was established in 1948 by Oscar Greeves after having built a 3-wheeler for his paralyzed cousin, Derry Preston-Cobb. As a result of the many casualties from the second World War Greeves realised the need for such transport to be widely available. After contacting the government they agreed to pay for the vehicles to be made of which sold in great numbers.”

INVACAR 01

INVACAR 01

The Museum of disABILITY History may be one of a handful of places in the U.S. where you will ever be able to see The INVACAR. This museum is full of wonderful treasures, so please visit if you have a chance! For more information, please click on the RED links below.

INVACAR 02

INVACAR 02

INVACAR 03

INVACAR 03

INVACAR 04

INVACAR 04

INVACAR 05

INVACAR 05 

INVACAR 06

INVACAR 06

INVACAR 07

INVACAR 07

 

A Visit To The Museum Of disABILITY History 11.11.2013

Yesterday, I visited The Museum of disABILITY History, located at 3826 Main Street, Buffalo, New York. I finally got to meet David Mack-Hardiman, Director of Training, People Inc., who gave me a tour of the museum, and Douglas V. Farley, Museum Director. I was very impressed with all the displays! This museum has so much to offer including Educational Resources, Activities, Traveling Exhibits, Cafe, and Museum Store. Please visit the museum if you have the chance!

Monument For The Forgotten

Monument For The Forgotten

My favorite exhibit, “The Monument For The Forgotten” was the vision of David Mack-Hardiman, created by Brian NeslineFaces of Buffalo, “featuring thousands of individual grave markers woven into a mosaic tapestry image of a large stone monument.” I need to acknowledge the selfless work that David and People Inc. have done over the past few years. David and his team go into these unmarked cemeteries, clear the brush away, mow the lawns, and raise and clean each marker. Some graves are flat, numbered markers while others, as in the case of a few New York State Custodial Institutions, have the names inscribed. This back-breaking work is done by volunteers! God Bless Them!

Monument For The Forgotten 2

Monument For The Forgotten 2

Mission: The Museum of disABILITY History advances the understanding, acceptance, and independence of people with disabilities. The Museum’s exhibits, collections, archives and educational programs create awareness and a platform for dialogue and discovery.

Vision: The Museum seeks with, and on behalf of, individuals with developmental and other disabilities, a higher level of societal awareness and understanding, and a change in attitudes, perceptions and actions that will result in people with disabilities having the greatest possible participation in their communities.”

Museum Of disABILITY History

Museum Of disABILITY History

“Established in 1998 by Dr. James M. Boles, president and CEO of People Inc. (Western New York’s leading non-profit human services agency) the Museum of disABILITY History has steadily expanded over the years and, in late 2010, moved to a brand new location (pictured above). The Museum of disABILITY History is dedicated to advancing the understanding, acceptance and independence of people with disabilities. The Museum’s exhibits, collections, archives and educational programs create awareness and a platform for dialogue and discovery. The Museum of disABILITY History is a project of People Inc. and is chartered by the New York State Department of Education Board of Regents. People Inc. exists so that individuals with disabling conditions or other special needs have the supports they need to participate and succeed in an accepting society. As noted throughout the site, this project has been developed with the generous support of People Inc. and the B. Thomas Golisano Foundation. We are truly thankful for their participation in this worthwhile effort.”

M 01

M 01

M 02

M 02

M 03

M 03

M 04-Straight Jacket

M 04-Straight Jacket

M 05

M 05

M 06

M 06

M 07

M 07

M 08

M 08

M 09

M 09

M 10

M 10

M 11

M 11

Lin and David Mack-Hardiman

Lin and David Mack-Hardiman

Jon Crispin – Willard Suitcases

Here is the link to Jon Crispin’s beautiful new website, Willard Suitcases.

Jon Crispin Suitcase 6 - http://joncrispin.wordpress.com/

Jon Crispin Suitcase 6 – http://joncrispin.wordpress.com/

Jon Crispin Suitcase 2 - http://joncrispin.wordpress.com/

Jon Crispin Suitcase 2 – http://joncrispin.wordpress.com/

The Branch – Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. – Pictorial Album of The Willard Asylum 1869 – 1886

More beautiful photographs from the book Pictorial Album Of The Willard Asylum 1869 to 1886 by Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. These photographs feature “The Branch” which was later re-named “Grand View” in 1904.

The Branch, constructed in 1859, was the original site of the first state agricultural college in the United States founded by Ezra Cornell. It was in operation from 1860 to 1861. The Civil War began, the young men went off to war, and the building fell into disrepair. In 1865, New York State purchased the building and land to be the site of The Willard Asylum for the CHRONIC Insane. The first of its kind in the country. Mr. Cornell went on to found Cornell University. The Branch housed about 225 “mild, quiet” female inmates. In 1886, the top two floors were removed and it was made into the “female” infirmary, housing those who could not take care of themselves, the sick and old, and those who could not use the “toilet” facilities. The Branch was not the main hospital building.

24-The Branch From The West-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

24-The Branch From The West-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

25-The Branch During Alterations-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

25-The Branch During Alterations-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

26-Excavating For The Addition To The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

26-Excavating For The Addition To The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

31-Physician, Apothecary & Attendants, The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

31-Physician, Apothecary & Attendants, The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

32-The Branch From The East-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

32-The Branch From The East-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

33-The Branch From The North-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

33-The Branch From The North-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

34-A Hall In The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

34-A Hall In The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

35-A View From The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

35-A View From The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

36-Horace G. Hopkins, M.D. & Anne Maycock Hopkins-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

36-Horace G. Hopkins, M.D. & Anne Maycock Hopkins-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

37-Parlor Of Dr. Horace G. Hopkins, The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

37-Parlor Of Dr. Horace G. Hopkins, The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

38-A Hall In The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

38-A Hall In The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

39-Physician's Bed-Room, The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

39-Physician’s Bed-Room, The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

40-The Branch, &c., From The South-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

40-The Branch, &c., From The South-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

42-The Branch During Alterations-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

42-The Branch During Alterations-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

43-Third Floor Hall Of The Branch During Alterations-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 197

43-Third Floor Hall Of The Branch During Alterations-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

44-The Branch During Alterations 2-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

44-The Branch During Alterations 2-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

45-The Branch Following Alterations-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

45-The Branch Following Alterations-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

46-Parlor Of Dr. Myron D. Blaine-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

46-Parlor Of Dr. Myron D. Blaine-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

47-Rooms Of Dr. Horace G. Hopkins, The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978

47-Rooms Of Dr. Horace G. Hopkins, The Branch-Wayne E. Morrison, Sr. 1978